[CE01]

Live At Trinity Club – Bombay 1967

Sadanand Naimpalli & Pandit Taranath

The legendary tabla maestro and teacher, Pandit Taranath leads his two young star students Sadanand Naimpalli and Mohan Balvally in a 45 minutes tabla duet in front of a wildly entusiastic audience at The Trinity Club in Bombay 1967. Pandit Taranath is not represented on record before.


tracks

  1. Vilambit Trital (20:40)
  2. Drut Trital (24:38)

musicians

Tabla: Sadanand Naimpalli
Tabla: Mohan Balvally
Harmonium/recitation: Pandit Taranath

more info

The album has got faboulous respons:

ROOTSWORLD, SEPTEMBER 2006 Link to a fabulous review by Warren Senders.

FOLK ROOTS, JANUARY 2006: COUNTRY AND EASTERN’S INAUGURAL RELEASES ARE LIKELY CONTENDERS FOR BEST-OF 2006

If I were demonstrating how to listen to Hindustani music, ”Live At Trinity Club – Bombay 1967” would be an essential introduction to the lost art of concert etiquette. Recorded at a music circle recital in Bombay, it ripples with attentiveness. ”Live…” is a time machine. You hear a discerning audience egging the musicians on in a typically very Indian style. Both musicians are playing for keeps, on their mettle owing to the presence of their guru.

JAZZWISE FEBRUARY 2006: Drink deep of this particular elixir, the most restorative live recording to come my way in years. If you want to know what a recital, in this case a tabla jugalbandi (duet) with melodic support, used to sound like with an audience locked ear to ear with the performers. I actually teared over with nostalgia for something that I had never experienced in person. For phenomenal music and atmosphere, this inspirational work deseves a place on any institution’s syllabus where Hindustani music is taught.

GLOBAL RHYTHM, JANUARY 2005: The Trinity Club, according to this album’s liner notes, written in retrospect by Pandit Naimpalli, was attended mostly by musicians; hence if one was to perform there, they’d better be good. That was certainly the case for these two young tabla players in the mid-’60s. The playing is spectacular. Both Naimpalli and Balvally perform with emotion, and the sophistication that has made Indian percussionists legendary. Sparse accompaniment (“lehra”) on harmonium and recitations by their guru, Pandit Taranath clearly inspired the men, then teenagers, that night. This album, despite its relative antiquity, will prove thoroughly rewarding.

TRADITIONAL INDIAN MUSIC, REVIEW PAGE: The Trinity club is one of the most known clubs for Hindustani classical music performances. This is a recording from the club with a harmonium, tampura accompanying a tabla duet, with one part in a slow tempo, and the other one fast. On the background, now and then, when one listens carefully, one can hear some riksha’s and cars passing by. It has a very repetitive harmonium and tampura background and some tabla improvisation. The repetition of the harmonium is recorded a bit too loud so that the repetition becomes somewhat unnerving. The tabla duet is nice, but the best thing on the album I think is the young enthusiasm especially expressed with the vocal rhythm technique, and with the public reacting on some rhythmic pulses at times, which makes the recording more special, especially near the last third of the recording.

SUBBARAO, NOVEMBER 2005: The Trinity club is one of the most known clubs for Hindustani classical music performances. This is a recording from the club with a harmonium, tampura accompanying a tabla duet, with one part in a slow tempo, and the other one fast. On the background, now and then, when one listens carefully, one can hear some riksha’s and cars passing by. It has a very repetitive harmonium and tampura background and some tabla improvisation. The repetition of the harmonium is recorded a bit too loud so that the repetition becomes somewhat unnerving. The tabla duet is nice, but the best thing on the album I think is the young enthusiasm especially expressed with the vocal rhythm technique, and with the public reacting on some rhythmic pulses at times, which makes the recording more special, especially near the last third of the recording.

 

On december 10 2010, 43 years after this recording, Pandit Sadanand Naimpalli has become one of the handful tabla players to be rated as ”Top Grade Artist” by the All India Radio. He played a concert at Södra Teatern in Stockholm together with Pandit Nityanand Haldipur, the fabulous flute player.
Swedish daily SvD had a fine review.

Videos w Sadanandji from Stockholm 2010:
Ajrada Peshkar after Ustad Habibuddin Khan

Here Pandit Sadanand plays the Megandhabar Paran, a famous composition by the great pakhawaj player Kudo Singh Maharaj. It depicts thunder and lightning and was recorded during Sadanandji’s visit to Stockholm in december 2010